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Vol.55 CONTENTS

Hiroshi MURAKAMI

Abstract

A new law, Basic Act on the Advancement of Utilizing Geospatial Information, was enacted by the National Diet in May 2007. This Act provides an overarching legal framework for the development, distribution and application of geospatial information so that people will be able to obtain maximum benefit out of this untapped domain of information, which is becoming increasingly available in digital form, by employing two key technologies, Geographic Information System and Space-based Positioning, Navigation and Timing. This paper summarizes the background and outline of this new legislation, and provides the author's views on the challenges for the successful implementation of its vision, in which the Geographical Survey Institute is expected to play a key role.

Contents

1. Introduction

2. Background of the New Legislation

  2.1 GIS Development

  2.2 PNT Development

3. Outline of New Legislation

4. Challenges in the Implementation of NSDI Act

Appendix

1. Basic Act on the Advancement of Utilizing Geospatial Information
2. Ordinance of the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport No. 78
3. Public Notice of the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport No. 1144
 
 
Taro UBUKAWA

Abstract

The Geographical Survey Institute of Japan has been implementing the Global Mapping project not only as the participating organization from Japan, but also as the Secretariat of the International Steering Committee for Global Mapping. As the Secretariat, the Geographical Survey Institute of Japan has made efforts to develop and promote the Global Mapping project through international cooperation. Due to these efforts, the development of Global Map version 1 has dramatically progressed toward the goal of the completion of global coverage. As of February 18, 2008, 162 countries and 16 regions are participating in the Global Mapping project (ca 97 % of the whole land area), and 48 countries and 3 regions have released their Global Map version 1 data (ca 49% of the whole land area). The International Steering Committee for Global Mapping plans to release Global Map Version 1 of all land areas of the globe in 2008.

Contents

1. Introduction
2. Background and Historical Review of the Global Mapping project
3. Current status of the Global Mapping project
  3.1 Contents of the Global Map
    3.1.1 Global Map version 1
    3.1.2 Global Map version 0
    3.1.3 Global Land Cover by National Mapping Organizations and Global Percent Tree Cover
  3.2 Progress of the Global Mapping project
4. Activities of GSI for the Global Mapping project
  4.1 Activities as the Secretariat of ISCGM
  4.2 Activities as a participating NMO
  4.3 Other activities
5. Relevant conferences and organizations
6. Application of the Global Map
  6.1 Disaster
  6.2 Education
  6.3 Promotion of the Global Map
7. Issues to be solved
  7.1 Challenges on data development
  7. 2 Data Quality
  7. 3 Challenges on using the data
8. Conclusion
Acknowledgement
References
 
 
Yuki Hatanaka

Abstract

A new version of the Receiver Independent Exchange (RINEX) format (version 3.0) for Global Navigation Satellite System(GNSS) observation data has been proposed by Gurtner and Estey (2006) to accommodate recent progress in the GNSS environment such as modernization of the Global Positioning System (GPS) and the emergence of new GNSS systems. The compact RINEX format version 3.0 has been developed to compress files in this format by adjusting the existing old compression format for RINEX version 2.xx. The compression rate, combined with the additional text compression, is about 38% of that with the simple application of text compression. The compression/decompression of both old and new formats can be performed seamlessly with the same tools and the same usage. The format and tools will contribute to the popularization of RINEX format version 3.00 and, through this, facilitate the exchange and use of GNSS data.

Contents

1. Introduction
2. Compression techniques and rules
  2.1 Definition of data series that are subjects of differential operation
  2.2 Differential operation for text data
  2.3 Differential operation for numeric data
  2.4 Limitation of the compression scheme
3. The Compact RINEX format version 3.0
4. Software tools
  4.1 The main tools
  4.2 Supplementary frontend tools
5. Compression performance and running speed
6. Conclusions
Acknowledgements
References

Appendix

1. Algorithm of Differential and Recovering Operations of Numeric Data Series
2. Specification of Compact RINEX Format Version 3.0
 
 
Izumi KAMIYA

Abstract

PRISM images have radiometric noise caused by JPEG compression. In order to improve the image quality, low frequency components of the JPEG data were modified by assuming the image is smooth. The proposed method reduced the JPEG noise and helped interpretation of the image. This algorithm has been implemented into the system to produce PRISM standard products by JAXA.

Contents

1. Introduction
  1.1 Overview of PRISM
  1.2 Noise of PRISM Image
2. ALGORITHM
  2.1 Histogram matching
  2.2 JPEG noise reduction
    2.2.1 DCT and IDCT
    2.2.2 Correction Formula
    2.2.3 Observation Equations
    2.2.4 Normal Equations
    2.2.5 Patching
3. Implementation and Experiments
4. Results
5. Discussion
6. Conclusions
Acknowledgment
Reference

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